Trade Agreement Gabon

Given that the Nigerian government continued to consult with local business groups in the second half of 2018, one of the main concerns was whether the agreement adequately prevented anti-competitive practices such as dumping. [59] At the close of 2018, former President Olusegun Obasanjo said the delay was “regrettable” and stressed the lack of trade in goods between African countries, the difficulties in getting from one African country to another, and the colonial legacy of these restrictions on Africa`s growth. [60] The government steering committee responsible for the consultation process is expected to release its report on the agreement in January 2019. [61] Eritrea has not signed because of tensions with Ethiopia, but after the 2018 Eritrea-Ethiopia summit, the AU Commissioner for Trade and Industry now expects Eritrea to sign the agreement. [93] Eritrea was not part of the original agreement because of the continuing state of war, but the 2018 peace agreement between Ethiopia and Eritrea ended the conflict and ended the barrier to Eritrea`s participation in the free trade agreement. [10] [30] [45] [46] [47] The unrecognized state of Somaliland was not involved in discussions on the creation of the agreement. The 12th African Union extraordinary meeting on AfCFTA was convened to bring the new agreement into its operational phase, which was held in Niamey on 7 July 2019. [40] [41] Most AU member states have signed the agreement. Benin, Botswana, Eritrea, Guinea-Bissau, Nigeria and Zambia did not sign the agreement. [63] Nigerian President Muhammadu Buhari was particularly reluctant to join if it against Nigerian entrepreneurship and Nigerian industry. [64] On 7 July 2019, Nigeria and Benin pledged to sign free trade with Africa at the 12th Special Session of the Association`s Assembly on ACFTA; Eritrea is the only country among the 55 member states of the African Union that has not signed the agreement. [65] [66] [41] At the Kigali Summit, areas of agreement were found on trade protocols, dispute settlement procedures, customs cooperation, trade facilitation and rules of origin. This was part of Phase I of the agreement, which deals with the liberalisation of goods and services.

There was also a consensus on reducing tariffs to 90% of all goods. Each nation can exclude 3% of the goods from this agreement. [25] With regard to the issue of plant hygiene and protection (SPS), Gabon follows the standard set by the World Health Organization, the FAO/CIS Codex Alimentarius Commission, the International Convention on Plant Protection (IPPC) and several other African and global conventions. However, the health control system remains inefficient and costly due to the lack of coordination and overlapping of jurisdiction between agencies and legal instruments (WTO 2013). Gabon does not treat SPS as an obstacle to trade, as it uses the same hygiene rules for every food commodity, whether it is produced domestically, imported from abroad or produced for export. Within the CEMAC Group, no agreement has been reached on the issue of technical barriers to trade (WTO 2013) despite calls for the removal of any measures that have a negative impact on trade between the parties.